Compressed air in the workplace is required for many jobs and tools, however it can be dangerous and must be used in a safe manner. Here are some tips when using a compressed air.

General Use

  • Keep air hose off the floor where it is a trip hazard and subject to damage by trucks, doors, and dropped tools. A damaged air hose could leak and inadvertently injure someone nearby.
  • Prevent sharp objects from rubbing against the hose. Be especially careful if the hose gets wedged in a corner or hung around a machine. Always go to the point where the hose is stuck and guide it. Don’t pull on the hose trying to free it, free it directly from the area it is caught up at.
  • Prior to use, ensure the connections are properly seated and there is no apparent damage to the hose or fittings. Weak points may swell like a balloon and burst, throwing pieces of hose in every direction. This may also cause the hose to thrash about dangerously.
  • If your area doesn’t have a self-retracting reel, always coil the hose—without kinks—and hang it over a broad support that is intended for hanging a hose.

When using it to clean objects:

  • Ensure you are wearing goggles or a face shield to protect your face and eyes. Air in excess of 30 psi. can blow an eye from its socket, and/or rupture an eardrum.
  • Always utilize approved air nozzles that reduce 90 psi air down to a safe level for such use.
  • Never aim the hose at yourself or someone else.
  • Never use compressed air to clean off your body. Air pressure against the skin may penetrate deeply, allowing air bubbles to get into your bloodstream and cause internal hemorrhage and intense pain.
  • Keep air hose off the floor where it is a trip hazard and subject to damage by trucks, doors, and dropped tools.
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